Cory Booker’ YEAH! LOVE, LOVE !!!!

#DemsSaidWhat#RNCResearch#MAGA

Cory Booker Agrees With Maxine

Cory Booker Agrees With Maxine On Harassing Trump Staffers: “Nothing Wrong With Confronting” Them

GOP War RoomPublished on Jun 25, 2018 

Senator Cory Booker agrees with Maxine Waters’ call to harass Trump staffers in public, saying there is “nothing wrong with confronting” them. Be sure to like, subscribe, and comment below to share your thoughts on the video. Subscribe for the latest on the Democrats’ hypocrisy, media bias and punditry, and coverage of President Trump’s accomplishments: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c… 

Be sure to click the YouTube bell located above to be notified each time we upload a new video. ****** Follow Us! Official RNC Research Twitter: twitter.com/RNCResearch RNC Research Director, Mike Reed: twitter.com/reed1311 RNC Research Deputy Director, Scott Parker: twitter.com/Scottty_P For regularly updated blog posts from RNC Research, visit gop.com/research/ #DemsSaidWhat?!? #RNCResearch#MAGA 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

Hillary Clinton: ‘You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to … Oct 9, 2018 – Washington (CNN) Hillary Clinton said Tuesday that civility in America can only begin again if Democrats win back the House or Senate this fall …

Washington (CNN) Hillary Clinton said Tuesday that civility in America can only begin again if Democrats win back the House or Senate this fall.”You cannot be civil with a political party that wants to destroy what you stand for, what you care about,” Clinton said in an interview with CNN’s Christiane Amanpour. “That’s why I believe, if we are fortunate enough to win back the House and or the Senate, that’s when civility can start again. But until then, the only thing that the Republicans seem to recognize and respect is strength.”

https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/09/politics/hillary-clinton-civility-congress-cnntv/index.html




California Leftist Politicians Should Be Ashamed.

California leftist politicians should be ashamed of themselves.

http://www.latimes.com/7e5dc395-a89f-43b5-9a33-9e70872a7c70

http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-without-a-home-sg-2018-storygallery.html

 

Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez roams greater L.A. with Times photographer Francine Orr and videographer Albert Lee and describes a scene of despair among the homeless.

  

They’re part of the Los Angeles streetscape, as familiar as the swaying palm trees and idling traffic, living under freeways, alongside riverbeds and on canyon hillsides. The mentally ill, the drug addicts, the economically disadvantaged, many with their life belongings in a backpack or shopping cart. In this ongoing series, Without a Home, The Times is examining the crisis of homelessness in our region.

Treating and housing the mentally ill is harder than jailing them. But it might actually work
Treating and housing the mentally ill is harder than jailing them. But it might actually work

Making jails the centerpiece of mental health treatment is a monumental betrayal of our claim to a humane and civilized society.

Don't let NIMBYs — or weak-kneed politicians — stand in the way of homeless housing
Don’t let NIMBYs — or weak-kneed politicians — stand in the way of homeless housing

Permanent supportive housing is our best bet for getting homeless people permanently off the streets.

The homeless in L.A. are not who you think they are
The homeless in L.A. are not who you think they are

High rents, few vacancies, stagnant incomes and a patchy government safety net — this is why Los Angeles is the facing an unprecedented homeless crisis.

Los Angeles’ homelessness crisis is a national disgrace
Los Angeles’ homelessness crisis is a national disgrace

It is neither desirable nor morally acceptable to blithely tolerate a level of destitution more commonly associated with Calcutta or Sao Paolo.

L.A. considers cutting through red tape to get homeless people housed faster
L.A. considers cutting through red tape to get homeless people housed faster

Two proposals would eliminate some hurdles for permanent supportive housing projects and make it easier to temporarily convert motels into homeless housing. But some critics say the supportive housing measure goes too far, depriving residents of a chance to voice concerns about projects.

A plan to house L.A.'s homeless residents could transform parking lots across the city
A plan to house L.A.’s homeless residents could transform parking lots across the city

A plan to make city property available for homeless housing projects is now focused almost entirely on about 120 public parking lots, most acquired by the city in the 1950s and 1960s to spur suburban commercial development. The conversions will require both architectural and political ingenuity.

Huge increase in arrests of homeless in L.A. — but mostly for minor offenses
Huge increase in arrests of homeless in L.A. — but mostly for minor offenses

Many arrests are for unpaid tickets, a Times analysis finds. Police say arrests are a necessary tool, while homeless advocates see a revolving door of debt and jail stays.

L.A.'s homelessness surged 75% in six years. Here's why the crisis has been decades in the making
L.A.’s homelessness surged 75% in six years. Here’s why the crisis has been decades in the making

A succession of mayors have tried different fixes since homelessness emerged as a crisis in the 1980s, but if the problem continues to climb at current rates, it will swamp even the best efforts.

L.A. homeless crisis grows despite political promises, many speeches and millions of dollars. How do we fix this?
L.A. homeless crisis grows despite political promises, many speeches and millions of dollars. How do we fix this?

Voters have approved billions of dollars to build housing and provide services. But so far, the impact on the streets has been negligible.

LATEST NEWS
  • Vintage Santa Barbara: Faithful companion stands the test of time
    -3476m
  • It’s a bad idea to raise the minimum age for buying long guns. It’s an even worse idea to arm teachers
    1h
    It's a bad idea to raise the minimum age for buying long guns. It's an even worse idea to arm teachers
  • $2 billion to help house California’s homeless isn’t being spent — and no one knows when it will be
    1h
    $2 billion to help house California's homeless isn't being spent — and no one knows when it will be
  • For the Record
    2h
  • Montecito is warned to evacuate ahead of storm, and jittery residents are ready to go
    4h
    Montecito is warned to evacuate ahead of storm, and jittery residents are ready to go

So sorry if this is too sad for you… I’ve posted many articles from OC Register about Homelessness in OC and the Santa Ana River all cleared out….
This is an article and a VIDEO from LA Times.
Without a Home: Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez roams greater L.A. with Times photographer Francine Orr and videographer Albert Lee and describes a scene of despair among the homeless.
They’re part of the Los Angeles streetscape, as familiar as the swaying palm trees and idling traffic, living under freeways, alongside riverbeds and on canyon hillsides. The mentally ill, the drug addicts, the economically disadvantaged, many with their life belongings in a backpack or shopping cart. In this ongoing series, Without a Home, The Times is examining the crisis of homelessness in our region.
READ MORE:
http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-without-a-home-sg-2018-storygallery.html

California Leftist Politicians

California Leftist Politicians Should Learn From Orange County.

Santa Ana River homeless encampment’s last residents move out

PUBLISHED:  | UPDATED: 

Orange County’s largest homeless encampment is no more.

On Monday, following a six-day blitz during which county officials moved 732 homeless people into local motels and shelters, the once-bustling tent encampment sat unoccupied. The last few occupants packed their belongings and left. Sheriff’s deputies guarded locked gates to the flood control channel, preventing people from reentering.

  • The few remaining homeless people living on the Santa Ana River Trail in are packing up Anaheim on Monday, Feb 26, 2018. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

1 of 4

The few remaining homeless people living on the Santa Ana River Trail in are packing up Anaheim on Monday, Feb 26, 2018. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

“This is a momentous occasion,” said Brooke Weitzman, an attorney who sued Orange County on behalf of seven homeless people, alleging the county’s initial attempts to clear the riverbed encampment in January violated her clients’ civil rights. She and the county later negotiated a stipulation, under pressure from a federal judge, allowing the county to resume clearing the encampment if it relocated its occupants to motels and other shelters.

“We have hundreds of people who would have been scattered in neighborhoods or arrested, now inside for the first time in years and connected to social services,” Weitzman said.

But getting people out of the riverbed is only phase one of the plan, she reminded.

The motel stays are essentially a stopgap fix to give the county time to expand its capacity at local shelters.

County spokeswoman Jen Nentwig said the county already has increased capacity at the Bridges at Kraemer Place homeless shelter in Anaheim, adding beds for an additional 65 people. County supervisors have discussed placing tents or semi-permanent structures on county land in Orange or Santa Ana to temporarily house more people.

County officials also agreed to clinically assess all of the former riverbed inhabitants.

“The OC Health Care Agency outreach folks will go and visit each of the individuals and conduct the assessment, and then go from there as far as identifying the most appropriate resources for each person,” Nentwig said.

Supervisors Todd Spitzer and Andrew Do said they were proud of the county and its staff for working quickly – and long hours – over the past week to find enough shelter for all the riverbed inhabitants and get them relocated.

Toppled tents and piles of debris still littered the riverbed Monday, and public works crews moved methodically through the area, clearing the trash. It will likely take another week until that process is finished and the remediation project can begin.

Sheriff’s deputies will begin enforcing trespassing laws in the riverbed and can cite or arrest anyone who re-enters the area.

Around 15 homeless people gathered outside a locked gate on Monday morning, among the last people to leave the encampment.

One woman was waiting on county staff to provide her with a bus ticket back to West Virginia. One man said he had lung cancer and was awaiting transport to recuperative care to receive medical treatment. Another man who had been found in the encampment on Monday morning – perhaps the final occupant of the tent city – lay slumped against a wall in tatters, head down, twitching uncontrollably.

John Leonard, 65, said he had been living in the riverbed for a quarter-century and wished he didn’t have to leave.

Leonard said he returned to get some of his clothes, which he left behind when county workers moved him into a motel a few days prior. He said he’s thankful for the help but he’s still getting used to living inside after nearly half a lifetime outdoors.

“It’s different,” Leonard said. “Four walls. It’s nice, but I might give it all up to come back out here.”

https://www.ocregister.com/2018/02/26/santa-ana-river-homeless-encampments-last-residents-move-out/

mental illness in California and the U.S.

A look at the prevalence of mental illness in California and the U.S.

A look at the prevalence of mental illness in California and the U.S.

mental-health-top
A look at the prevalence of mental illness in California and the U.S.

16 COMMENTS

PUBLISHED:  | UPDATED: 

Mental illness cases have risen in California, while treatment and funding have not kept up.

Every Southern California county has experienced an upward trend in the rate at which children under 18 years are hospitalized for a mental health issue.

“The mental health system has been plagued by gaps in services, access and funding,” says Dr. Dr. Clayton with St. Joseph Hoag Health. “People with severe mental health and substance abuse conditions struggle to receive needed care in their communities due to stigma and difficulty navigating a complicated system.

“Often, patients with severe mental illness and substance use disorders end up in hospital emergency rooms because they have nowhere else to go.”

Since 1995, California’s population has increased by more than 7 million people, but the facilities and beds for acute psychiatric care have decreased.

Pschiatric beds in CaliforniaBeds in California by populationPsychiatric beds by countyPrevalence in the U.S.

43.8 million adults experience mental illness in a given year.

Poorest School District, Highest Paid Superintendent!

Ex-San Ysidro School Superintendent’s Was Highest Paid In County, Second In State

Leonardo Castañeda | inewsource

Taxpayers in the San Ysidro School District paid Superintendent Julio Fonseca, who resigned last month, at least $1 million in total compensation for 26 months of work in one of San Diego County’s poorest school districts.

inewsource
inewsource is an independent and nonprofit journalism organization in San Diego, and relies on grants and philanthropists to support its investigative content. Click here to learn more.

inewsource is the first to detail Fonseca’s compensation from his time in San Ysidro, including two little-known perks for life insurance and health care. His salary, benefits and severance package average out to make him the highest paid school district superintendent in San Diego County and the second highest paid in California based on data from Transparent California. The nonprofit think tank compiles public employee pay and pension information.

“I think he (Fonseca) abused his power. He took the board as fools,” said school board member Rodolfo Linares, who believes he and his fellow trustees were misled last year when they approved certain benefits for the superintendent.

Linares said he wants the board to investigate how that happened and wants the district to rescind Fonseca’s nearly $376,000 separation agreement.

“I’m not going to be silent. (The) community needs to know,” Linares said. “We are board members, we were elected to protect the district and the students. And it’s our duty to investigate.”

inewsource’s attempts to reach Fonseca by phone and at his publicly listed residence were unsuccessful.

By combing through his contract and other public records, inewsource pieced together this breakdown of Fonseca’s compensation from July 1, 2015 to Sept. 1, 2017:

  • Cumulative salary: $479,234.
  • Separation agreement: $375,703.
  • Deferred life insurance: $106,000.
  • Gap health care coverage: $37,000.
  • Mileage and cellphone: $15,600.
  • One-time housing allowance: $10,000.
  • Health care benefits: $45,500.

Fonseca’s compensation, excluding his pension, averaged out to about $493,000 annually. That’s significantly more than the roughly $346,000 in compensation that Transparent California said Cindy Marten made in 2016 to head the San Diego Unified School District, the second largest district in California.